Resources

 

Water Risk Assessment & Stakeholder Engagement

Companies use a variety of tools to determine whether the catchments in which they operate are particularly exposed to water risk, as well as to better understand the nature of risk in specific catchments. There are also a variety of tools and resources geared toward facilitating stakeholder engagement. A few of these tools are listed here.

Characterizing Water-Related Challenges and Identifying Collective Action Areas

This appendix details how to characterize your water-related challenges and identify the needed action areas. This characterization builds from exploring the following questions:

  • What are your priority water-related challenges, and how might they be changing over time?
  • What underlying deficiencies in the water management system have led to the challenges?
  • What additional drivers or factors, if any, contribute to the challenges?
  • Which collective action interventions (action areas) will best address the problems you have identified?

Identifying and Characterizing Interested Parties

This appendix provides a framework to systematically identify and characterize the external parties that may have an interest in participating in your collective action effort. This appendix describes six analysis areas capable of answering the key questions, described in Identifying and Characterizing Prospective Participants, related to characterizing external parties for potential involvement in your collective action. Through these analyses, you are able to link the interested parties with the collective action areas you identified in Scoping Water Challenges and Action Areas. The decision of how to engage a given interested party is strongly tied to the results of your analyses and is covered in more detail in Designing Collective Action Engagement and Structuring and Managing.

Selecting Collective Action Engagement Level

Levels of Engagement and Selecting the Level of Engagement profiled four collective action engagement levels for structuring collective action activity. These engagement levels represent substantially divergent commitments and serve substantially different purposes. For collective action to be successful, you must explicitly match collective action areas and outcomes with the associated key interested parties, and with the engagement level that will most effectively support the effort. As described in Selecting the Level of Engagement, selecting from the engagement options— informative, consultative, collaborative, and integrative—involves the exploration of three controlling factors: external-party dependence, external-party interest and capacity, and internal-company interest and capacity. This appendix describes in detail each of the controlling factors and outlines questions for each factor, whose aggregated answers will support identification of your collective action requirements and the corresponding appropriate collective action engagement. Worksheet D1 provides space to document your answers. The results obtained here can then be fed into your collective action development in Designing Collective Action Engagement and Structuring and Managing.

Considering the Five Principles of Responsible Business Engagement with Water Policy

The Mandate’s Guide to Responsible Business Engagement with Water Policy outlined and described five principles to adhere to when attempting to promote sustainable water management and improved water governance. Here we show how these principles apply to the suggestions and approached described in this Guide.

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